Five-star review for vampire novel

Five-star review of Beside the Darker Shore

Excerpt:

“Beside the Darker Shore is different. It is not your usual vampire tale. There is no sex in the book, per se, but it is one of the most powerfully sensual books I have read. When humans offer their blood to vampires, the eroticism of the bloodletting has no need for sex. When Stephen is in the throes of his addiction for donating, he is lost to everything but that act in that moment. Ms. Esposito beautifully conveys the addiction and the yearning for the giving through her words…I liked the characters. While there are villains in Beside the Darker Shore, they are not the stereotypical villains of vampire novels…I hope Ms. Esposito is planning a sequel or prequel. There are many unanswered questions and these are characters that have not left my mind since I finished the book.”

 

 

Available at the publisher Eternal Press or all major booksellers 

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A seduction

Vampires. They tickle and tease the neck’s quivering willingness. From the peach tree, ripe fruit drops to the grassy hillside. Her skin peach under his cool lips…waits, tender and ready to be pricked. Full-leafed branches rustle and sway in a trembling wind. It shivers up her body as she tilts into his grip. A rain of ready fruit drums to earth, thunder in her gut, blood engulfed, swollen and ready to pour.

More vampire writings at

http://www.amazon.com/Beside-the-Darker-Shore-ebook/dp/B005BENI5E

Vampires and the Sensual Awakening

I’m no longer sure there is an appeal to vampires that’s any different from the appeal of pirates or cowboys/girls or folks in uniform or witches and warlocks.

One reader says it’s the heightened senses conveyed in stories about vampires, another says it’s the bad boy allure, another says it’s the protective strength, and still more call it the aspect of danger or the tortured soul or the gift of eternity.

Couldn’t most of these be applied to any antihero? Someone who is set apart whether by job or by general essence. There is something different about them. A challenge to the norm. We have to step out of ourselves and what we know, take a chance, risk.

I don’t think the desire to take a risk is the same as liking the “bad boy” or “bad girl.” Look how many have fallen in love with the good vampires of Twilight. But they do offer something different.

So, if the appeal of antiheroes is fairly universal, then why does one reader choose vampires and another pirates? I wonder if it reverts back to our first awakenings of sensuality or first taste of adventure.

My older sister had me watch Christopher Lee when I was fairly young. I saw something I’d never seen before. I saw a man bending over a woman who leaned her head back willingly, opening her neck to his lips. I saw something in their eyes that I’d never seen in kid-TV. Sensuality. Heightened pleasure. It looked a little dangerous but irresistible. A bit like sex.

For someone else, it might have been the cowboy sweeping the wild-haired woman up onto his horse. Or maybe that look on the pirate’s face when he saw the reward of his travels: adventure. Our first taste of something new that set the adrenaline pumping and imprinted in our memory.

Stories imprint in our memory. Reading is sometimes about learning and sometimes about adventure, often both. Our peculiar passions are part of our growth.

Just as vampires have grown into our culture, the thing of the night, night’s potential. They will always be here, just as the antiheroes will always appeal, in whatever dress they wear.

Something different, something to take us out of ourselves, a step away from safety, with the promise of adventure, the promise of good or wicked pleasure.

Truth and Beauty, Beauty and Truth

The ten most beautiful women. The ten most beautiful men. We jump to leaf through the list, knowing amid the ten, there might be one on which we agree. Oh, the others might be appealing, might have features we appreciate, but are they the epitome of beauty? Sometimes only one, sometimes none really stand out for any given person. Who is top on your list?

 

For that matter, what natural wonders of the world are the most beautiful? Is a beach sunset the purest beauty or a mountain peak sun-glistened? If we disagree on what is most beautiful, is beauty subjective? Or is it objective, with one true definition?

 

When in mathematics, a theory is defined in the perfect equation, simple, accurate, absolute, it is often called beautiful. In chemistry, the blending of compounds is sometimes called a beautiful synthesis. Is it true what Keats said in his poem? Beauty is truth, truth is beauty?

 

While looking at life events, recording memories, creating sketches of people I see, and responding to things I hear or read, I hope to look at all life’s seductions, the things that spark us, that stand out as real, as beautiful in one way or another. I believe that something in our subconscious responds to equations of truth, the world when it shows us true grace.

The Muse

Through black-rimmed glasses, his eyes squint under the tug of pure pleasure. He smiles, his high-boned cheeks a shine, hair fringed careless under baseball cap—a man caught in spontaneous and unaffected beauty. This is him, undiluted. What he feels, you will see. In those brown, summer-sun-flecked eyes, there is no lie. Anger glares hard; doubt calculates and surmises; frustration burns; mischief tempts and teases; he dares, he challenges, he demands. So when that strong jaw, etched with unshaven care, relaxes, when those luscious lips spread wide—white-smiling, cheek-appling, eye-glinting in glimmering-sun-rayed-dance—you dismantle in a tingling melt. Let it come: beauty in its most genuine essence. Him: life at its most worthwhile.

In a quiet space of time

We daydream when we’re driving, right? The radio’s on and sometimes a song draws us in; sometimes the music is just a rhythm in the background of our thoughts. It’s a bit of space in the day when we’re not doing work and chores, attending meetings, handling phone calls.

Then we pull into the gas station, where sun shines off the pumps and the few decorative trees shiver a bit in the light wind. A landscaping truck is pulled beside the air pump; men stand about and talk. A white-haired woman holds her cash card, hesitant before fitting it to the slot. Pumping gas: a few minutes of stillness, a moment to let the world around sink in while there’s nothing else to do.

Except now, when I open my door, I’m blasted with talk. Gas station TVs, commercials talking at me, media overload, loud voices crashing over the vibration of leaves.

I do not like this innovation.

The men who lean against the truck, cross their legs comfortably and laugh with each other. They’re far enough away not to hear. I want to smother the TV; I want to feel the sun instead.

Vampire novel wins Reviewer’s Choice Award

I was very happy to hear that my vampire novel was chosen as Reviewer’s Choice for December at Two Lips Reviews, where the reviewer had this to say:

“Beside the Darker Shore is different. It is not your usual vampire tale. There is no sex in the book, per se, but it is one of the most powerfully sensual books I have read. When humans offer their blood to vampires, the eroticism of the bloodletting has no need for sex. 

“While there are villains in Beside the Darker Shore, they are not the stereotypical villains of vampire novels. There was no right or wrong. There is an air of ‘what is best for me’ for each character. … For the pain each of these men brings to the other, it is hard to dislike any of them. Each is fighting for what he believes …these are characters that have not left my mind since I finished the book.”

For more of the review or to see what other novels were selected for the Reviewer’s Choice Award, visit 

http://www.twolipsreviews.com/content/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2002&Itemid=61